Communications

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Communications Committee – The communications committee is looking for interested members to help plan and execute a communications strategy for our local. This strategy will look at how internal and external communications are delivered. We will also look at how to leverage social media and traditional media in our operations. Time committment for this committee will be minimal but there will likely be ongoing teleconferences/emails in the development of the strategy.

Members: Mandeep Mahanger (Chair), Ron Arnett and Dylan Wells

Communications Committee – The communications committee is looking for interested members to help plan and execute a communications strategy for our local. This strategy will look at how internal and external communications are delivered. We will also look at how to leverage social media and traditional media in our operations. Time committment for this committee […]

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Occupational Health & Safety

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Introduction

Your Occupational Health and Safety Committee is in place to help protect the Members of CUPE 1767.  The Health and Safety of our Members is a top priority.  Every Member in our Local has the right to a safe workplace.  We must protect this right.

A safe workplace means different things to different people and people have different perceptions as to what a safe workplace is.  To some it may mean breathing clean air, having a comfortable and ergonomically correct workstation, having the snow removed from the office parking lot, having enough field workers to do the job, not having to put up with any verbal abuse from an untrusting, unprofessional/incompetent manager, and the list can go on and on.  Each of the above items are all serious concerns, plus the lists could expand to hundreds more, and each are Health and Safety concerns that must be dealt with and will not be tolerated by this Committee or this Local.

Over the years, CUPE has helped strengthen the Health & Safety laws in BC.  We have all heard about the degradation of government services over the past several years, however, most of us have not experienced these unnecessary service cuts.  Not until you experience some of these barbaric cuts, or have a family member needing services that are no longer available or are only available at horrendous cost, will you really know what has happened to your services over the past several years.  It is a sad state of affairs.  We must speak out and against any government, including the BC Liberals, regarding any threats of changes to WCB Regulations and Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and any other cuts to our workforces or services.  We must all protect the gains we have made in creating a healthier and safer workplace for now and for the future.

The OH&S Committee is also part of the Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee.  There are two CUPE 1767 Representatives on this Committee along with two non-union representatives from the employer.  The union representatives for 2016-2017 are Christina Infanti and Mandeep Mahanger.  Members of the JOH&S Committee are always available to discuss any health and/or safety concern from any employee of BC Assessment Authority.  This Committee is required by law and meets several times throughout the year.  Besides face-to-face meetings, this Committee communicates by various electronic means in order to deal with issues expediently and cost-effectively.

As stated in Section 9 of our Collective Agreement, “The Authority and its employees acknowledges the mutual benefit to be derived from joint consultation and its value in maintaining and improving service to the public and agree therefore to consult and act on matters of the common interest, as appropriate, when requested by either party.”

Local Office Safety Committees

Along with the OH&S Committee and the JOH&S Committee, there are Local Office Safety Committees in each office.  These front line committees consist of one Union Representative (usually the Area Rep) and one manager from the non-union ranks.  This Committee is required to meet monthly as dictated by law in Division 4 of the WCB Regulations.  WCB has allowed our employer a variation in the number of members required on the Local Office Safety Committee.  WCB Regulations states that, for offices over 20 people, a 4 person Committee is required.  Due to the active involvement of the JOH&S Committee, a variation has been given requiring only 2 people on the Local Office Safety Committee providing that all offices participate.  Offices that do not participate in holding monthly meetings and posting the Local Office Safety Meetings Minutes may require WCB to re-examine and remove their variation given to BC Assessment.  The minutes from these meetings are reviewed by the JOH&S Committee.

The JOH&S Committee is proud of their accomplishments over the years that have lead the employer in establishing a Non-Smoking Workplace (one of the first in the Province), Flu Shot Program (funded by the employer), Evacuation Procedures, Ergonomic training (Handheld and Workstation), Violence Prevention training, Violent Prevention Policy, First Aid Policy, employer purchase of health and safety videos, and on-going risk assessment (just to name a few).

 

Reporting Forms

Items of concerns from the Membership are usually fed back to this Committee by completing the appropriate form.  There is a form for reporting any health and safety concern called theLocal Safety Return and another for reporting any and all violent incidents called the Violent Incident Report.  These forms are located in the Forms section of this website or the BC Assessment Employee Portal and are also available from your Area Rep.

The Local Safety Return is the means of communicating a concern to the JOH&S Committee.  Steps to completing this form:

The Area Rep, Alt Rep or the member with the concern fills out the form to the headingAction Taken by Manager.  Be as detailed and factual as possible.  Date and sign the form.  Attach a written sheet if more details are required.  Make a copy for your records.

After you have completed the top part of the form it is given to your manager for them to complete.  Time may be given to the manager to check into corrective action.  One or two days at the most should be sufficient for most concerns.  Note: you can contact a member of the JOH&S Committee at any time to discuss or inform us of the concern.

When you get the form back from the manager or if a couple of days have passed and no appropriate action is being taken, contact either Lauralee Epps or Tina Dhami.

The Local Safety Return becomes a valuable tool to the JOH&S Committee as to the memberships concerns.  Even if the issue is resolved at the local level, it informs the Committee as to a concern and may help in eliminating other similar concerns.

The Violent Incident Report Form is completed after any incident in which a member’s safety has been threatened by someone other than a fellow employee.  Follow the following steps:

Part A is to be completed by the employee.  Make a copy and give it to your Local Safety Officer (usually the Area or Alt Rep).

 of the incident give Part A along with Part B to your Manager to complete and to take action.

The form then goes to the Local Safety Officer (Area or Alt Rep) for the completion of Part C.  If the action taken by the manager is acceptable to the employee who initiated the concern then this would be stated in this section.

Parts B & C must be completed and sent to the Area Assessor or HO Director, JOH&S Committee and the employee who is reporting the incident within 72 hours

Chair: Christina Infanti, Member: Mandeep Mahanger Member at large: Stephanie Vielle

Introduction Your Occupational Health and Safety Committee is in place to help protect the Members of CUPE 1767.  The Health and Safety of our Members is a top priority.  Every Member in our Local has the right to a safe workplace.  We must protect this right. A safe workplace means different things to different people and […]

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Finance

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This committee deals with budget items and funds of the local.  It also deals with the locals human resources items and is reported out within the Secretary/Treasurers report at each of the executive meetings and the AGM.

David Robertson (chair), Jared Melvin and Harp Sandhu

This committee deals with budget items and funds of the local.  It also deals with the locals human resources items and is reported out within the Secretary/Treasurers report at each of the executive meetings and the AGM. David Robertson (chair), Jared Melvin and Harp Sandhu

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Policy

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Harp Sandhu (Chair), Christina Infanti, Jared Melvin

Harp Sandhu (Chair), Christina Infanti, Jared Melvin

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Wellness Committee

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 Introduction 

The intent of the Wellness Committee is to report to the Executive Board and the membership on the status of the LTD programme and how well it is working.  As well as reporting the numbers of members on LTD, the Committee Chair is also responsible for reporting the number of members on Short Term Disability with the possibility of going on LTD.  The Chair will liaise with the Human Resources Department to insure relevant forms are sent in a timely manner, to ascertain if individuals are refused LTD and the reasons for these decisions. If the reasons are one of procedure, this Committee identifies what needs to change to facilitate the process.  It may be necessary for the Chair or the President to attend meetings with the benefits carrier.  The Committee also oversees or develops resolutions for the betterment of the LTD programme and submits to the Annual General Meeting.  This may expedite the development of such resolutions by way of an overview through the Wellness committee.

Chair – Tina Dhami Members: Jared Melvin, Paul Mrazek, Dylan Wells, Sarah Mattson Members at large: Tom O’Brien, Lorraine Gilbert, Sarah Davy

 Introduction  The intent of the Wellness Committee is to report to the Executive Board and the membership on the status of the LTD programme and how well it is working.  As well as reporting the numbers of members on LTD, the Committee Chair is also responsible for reporting the number of members on Short Term Disability […]

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Job Evaluation – Reclassification

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This is addressed in Article 27 of the Collective Agreement. There are basically two ways a job may be reclassified and thereby re-evaluated. The first is if the employer wishes to change a job description. This can only be done with the approval of the Union. (See Article 27.02) If the Union agrees with the employer to proceed, it is simply a matter of negotiations between the parties.

The second is when a member believes their job has substantially changed in job content and duties subsequent to the Pay Equity Project in 2003. (See Article 27.03) In this case, the member would thoroughly document their case and submit it through their Union Regional Director to the Job Evaluation / Classification Review Committee. The committee will then adjudicate whether a change may be warranted and bring their findings and recommendation to the Executive Board of the Union. If the recommendation is positive, and approved by the Executive Board, the procedure set out in 27.03(b) of the Collective Agreement will be followed.

If there are any questions regarding Job Evaluation and Position review, contact the Union office at 1 877 946-4941, or send an e-mail to cupe1767@telus.net

Members: Harp Sandhu (Chair), Jared Melvin, Tom O’Brien, David Robertson, Mandeep Mahanger. Alternates: Tom O’Brien, Lorraine Gilbert

 

If video below doesn’t display properly, try going full screen, then minimizing again.  Sorry for any inconvenience.

 

This is addressed in Article 27 of the Collective Agreement. There are basically two ways a job may be reclassified and thereby re-evaluated. The first is if the employer wishes to change a job description. This can only be done with the approval of the Union. (See Article 27.02) If the Union agrees with the […]

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Technological Change

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The mandate of the Technological Change Committee is to liaise with the employer on technological matters, to investigate the impact of these matters on the membership and to report back to the Executive Board with information and recommendations.

Chair – Dylan Wells, Members: Mandeep Mahanger, Paul Mrazek Members at large: Pete Dumbleton, Dion Savard

The mandate of the Technological Change Committee is to liaise with the employer on technological matters, to investigate the impact of these matters on the membership and to report back to the Executive Board with information and recommendations. Chair – Dylan Wells, Members: Mandeep Mahanger, Paul Mrazek Members at large: Pete Dumbleton, Dion Savard

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Grievance Committee

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Too often individuals are intimidated into not lodging a grievance when their rights have been violated.  The Grievance Committee is here to help you, but we require your assistance in return and your willingness to grieve where it is the prudent thing to do.

If you have concerns that you feel should be elevated to the Grievance Committee, your first contact should be your Area Rep or Alternate.  Your Area Rep will discuss the problem with you and then contact your Regional Director.

There are sometimes opportunities outside of the grievance procedure to resolve a situation, even at the local office level, but there are also times when nothing but a grievance will cause the employer to adhere to the provisions of the Collective Agreement or right a wrong.

It is important to remember that it is only the Local (namely the Grievance Committee) that files a grievance, not individual members.  The Grievance Committee will evaluate the situation and carefully draft the grievance to obtain the best resolution available.  A grievance citing the wrong article or that limits its resolve runs the risk of not being win-able.

The grievance procedure is laid out under Article 12 of the Collective Agreement.  Time is of the essence! If an event has occurred that you feel requires a grievance, your Grievance Committee has only 14 working days from the date of that event to lodge a grievance.  This period allows heads to cool and the discussions to occur between the member, the Area Rep, the Grievance Committee and management.  However, if you’ve waited until 13 days later to contact someone, we run the risk of being ‘out of time’ and the situation not being grieve-able.

When a grievance is lodged at Step I, the Area Rep and local management have three working days to explore the issue.  The Rep should only collect information from management at this stage and must not seek resolution without prior discussion with the Regional Director and Grievance Committee.

If there is no resolution at Step I, then the Grievance Committee has the option of elevating the grievance to Step II.  A further 10 days is available for the Union Regional Director to explore the issue at this Step with the appropriate Employer’s Executive Director or Department Head, usually with a representative of the Grievance Committee.

If still unresolved, then the Grievance Committee has the option of elevating the grievance to Step III.  A period of 10 working days is available for the Chief Grievance Office and the Assessment Commissioner to try to arrive at a resolution.  If this resolution is not forthcoming and Step III expires, the Union has 14 days within which to refer the grievance to a board of arbitration.

Each of these steps may be extended by mutual decision and is done to allow time for further consultation, research and discussion with the employer.

Policy grievances start at Step II and are lodged by the Grievance Committee in cases where an issue involves a question of general application or interpretation.

Personnel records

Section 14.03 of the Collective Agreement states:

At the request of an employee, records of verbal or written reprimands shall be removed from the employee’s file after 24 months of the date of reprimand provided the employee has been actively employed for the majority of the two year period and provided no other discipline has occurred over the 24 months.”

Members should avail themselves of this provision, if applicable.

Chair: Paul Mrazek, Chief Grievance Officer: Jared Melvin, members: Ron Arnett, Tina Dhami, Sarah Mattson

Too often individuals are intimidated into not lodging a grievance when their rights have been violated.  The Grievance Committee is here to help you, but we require your assistance in return and your willingness to grieve where it is the prudent thing to do. If you have concerns that you feel should be elevated to […]

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Joint Telework

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Chair – Christina Infanti
Member – Harp Sandhu, Ron Arnett Members at Large: Crystal Johnston

Chair – Christina Infanti Member – Harp Sandhu, Ron Arnett Members at Large: Crystal Johnston

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PIPA

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Personal Information Protection Policy September, 2004

This policy applies to CUPE Local 1767 and has been adopted pursuant to the

Personal Information Protection Act (BC). This policy was presented, opened for discussion, voted on, and accepted by the delegates at the 2004 CUPE 1767 AGM.

CUPE 1767 as a union is responsible under the Protection of Personal Information Act (BC) (PIPA) to protect what is defined in PIPA as “personal information” and “employee personal information”.

  • PERSONAL INFORMATION defined: any information about an identifiable individual, including employee personal information, and not including “contact information” and “work product information”. Contact information is work contact information only such as name, work position, business title, work email, work phone number, etc. Work product information includes information prepared or collected by the union or its members as part of the union’s responsibilities or activities related to union activity. This would include the handling of a member’s grievance or collective bargaining.

An example of personal information would be a members’ unlisted home phone number.

    • EMPLOYEE PERSONAL INFORMATION defined: “personal information” about someone that’s collected, used or disclosed to establish, manage or terminate their employment, but not including “personal information” that’s not connected to their employment.

An example of “employee personal information” would be our Business Agents resume.

Not all information about all individuals is affected by PIPA. Much of the information CUPE 1767 collects and uses about individuals is defined in PIPA as “work product information” about its members, collected and used by CUPE as a collective organization, for purposes connected to promoting the welfare of the group. This information is not subject to PIPA.

Other information collected and used by CUPE 1767 is subject to PIPA. That information includes personal information about its Members, employee(s) as well any information about others in the community who are not CUPE 1767 members.

CUPE 1767 protects the information of its members by ensuring that it is not disclosed to non-members except as necessary to further the interests of the membership as a whole.

Members who are concerned about the disclosure of information about them are encouraged to raise those issues with the CUPE 1767 Executive Board, with final decisions to be made democratically according to our Local’s Constitution and Bylaws.

This policy is designed to cover what is defined in PIPA as “personal information” and “employee personal information”, which is included in “personal information”. Where applicable, the principles of privacy protection contained in this policy should also be followed with respect to member information as well as the information covered under PIPA. Members are encouraged to use the democratic processes of the union to ensure that privacy is appropriately protected within CUPE 1767 and by CUPE 1767.

Protection of “Personal Information” and “Employee Personal Information”

CUPE 1767 as an organization is responsible for the protection of “personal information” and the proper handling of it at all times, throughout CUPE and in dealings with outside parties. We recognize that our proper handling of “personal information” is both essential to the individuals concerned and to our reputation as a union.

CUPE subscribes to the following principles for the protection of “personal information” and “employee personal information”:

1. Accountability

CUPE Local 1767 has a Privacy Coordinator to look after the protection of information under PIPA. Individuals who are concerned about information CUPE 1767 possesses, and how it is stored, used and disclosed are encouraged to contact our Privacy Coordinator.

Our Privacy Coordinator is responsible for handling questions and requests for information from the public and our members, as well as making recommendations to the Executive Board for the handling and protection of information. CUPE welcomes suggestions made to the Privacy Coordinator on how we can improve and maintain our protection of privacy.

The Privacy Coordinator will also work with other Privacy Coordinators and resource people within both CUPE BC and CUPE National to ensure that our privacy protection measures are appropriate and effective.

2. Identifying the purpose of collection, use and disclosure

Where PIPA requires it, CUPE will identify the reasons for collecting “personal information” or “employee personal information” before or at the time we collect it. As required, we will document those reasons and inform the individual from whom it is to be collected. Any further use of the information will be subject to a new consent where PIPA requires it.

3. Obtaining consent for collection, use and disclosure

It is our policy to obtain consent for the collection, use and disclosure of “personal information” as required by PIPA.

4. Limiting collection

In general, it is our policy to avoid the unnecessary collection of information. Where “personal information” under PIPA is involved, or may be involved, we will require consultation with the Privacy Coordinator or reference to the written directions of the Privacy Coordinator.

5. Limiting use, disclosure and retention

“Personal information” should only be used for the purpose for which it was collected, and should not be retained after its purpose is finished according to PIPA. There are uses for which the purpose may only seem to be completed, however. Members and employees must refer to the Privacy Coordinator for direction before destruction of “personal information” pursuant to PIPA to ensure that destruction is appropriate. Instead of destruction, the information may sometimes be altered to remove identifying information if appropriate.

The Privacy Coordinator will coordinate regular reviews with the Executive Board and any Employee(s) of CUPE 1767 to ensure that “personal information” is not retained unnecessarily.

6. Maintaining accuracy

CUPE 1767 will take every reasonable step to ensure that information used in decision making or disclosed to third parties is accurate and complete. Before making such decisions or disclosures, “personal information” must be checked.

7. Using appropriate safeguards

“Personal information” under PIPA must be protected from theft or unwarranted disclosure. All members and employees of CUPE 1767 will be advised of this requirement.

The Privacy Coordinator is responsible for ensuring that CUPE maintains adequate safeguards against theft or unauthorized access, use or disclosure. These measures will be reasonably strict depending on the sensitivity of the information involved and will be reviewed on a regular basis by the Privacy Coordinator. Any situation(s) of concern where there is a lack or seemingly a lack of safeguards shall be brought in writing to the attention of the Privacy Coordinator.

8. Openness

CUPE will make all reasonable efforts to inform the public, its members and its Employee(s) of this policy and any subsequent policy with respect to “personal information” under PIPA.

It is our intention to protect “personal information” as defined in PIPA, and to be as open to suggestion, criticism, complaint and inquiry as we can. The Policy Coordinator will be responsible for dealing as quickly as possible with the public, members and employees who have concerns they wish to raise and with the Privacy Commissioner under PIPA.

Complaints and requests under PIPA will be handled by the Privacy Coordinator, who will be happy to assist in drafting them.

9. Giving individuals access

Under PIPA, individuals have rights to access their “personal information”. Requests for access should be made to the Privacy Coordinator, who will respond to them as quickly and effectively as possible subject to PIPA’s requirements. If correction of the “personal information” is appropriate, the Privacy Coordinator will receive and act on a request for correction according to PIPA’s requirements. If there is a disagreement about accuracy of the “personal information”, PIPA requires CUPE 1767 to make a note of the requested correction attached to the document where the disputed information appears.

Fees may be charged under PIPA for access to “personal information”, and may include the costs to CUPE 1767 of finding and copying such information. We will keep any such fees to a minimum, covering only our costs. Before doing the work, an estimate of any fees to be charged will be given.

10. Appeals

Any decision of the Privacy Coordinator may be appealed to the Executive Board. CUPE 1767 will make every reasonable effort to resolve disputes without the need to involve the Privacy Commissioner under PIPA.

Respectfully Submitted In Solidarity and Trust

Stan Brost
Privacy Coordinator
CUPE 1767

PIPA

On January 1, 2004, the Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) came into effect. PIPA will regulate the way private sector organizations collect, use, keep secure and disclose personal information.

PIPA will ensure that organizations that hold information about individuals handle that personal information responsibly. It also gives individuals control over the way information about them is handled and a right to request access to and correction of their personal information.

History and Reasons for PIPA

The following is a condensed version for the reasons for PIPA and the path it has taken to come into effect. Private sector privacy is increasingly a public priority across Canada. Surveys have shown a consistently high level of public concern over privacy issues – and a reluctance to fully embrace electronic commerce because of a fear of exchanging personal information over the Internet. Privacy and data protection issues are also an international priority. As early as 1980, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) issued the Guidelines on the Protection of Privacy and Transborder Flows of Personal Data. Canada became a signatory to these guidelines in 1984. In October of 1998, the European Union took a significant additional step in regulating private sector privacy through its Data Protection Directive. The European Union directive regulates all data transfers to and/or from European Union states. This would prevent data sharing with jurisdictions, including Canada, which did not have an equal level of data protection. From within Canada, there were pressures for private sector privacy from a range of interests and sectors. Most jurisdictions now have in place strong privacy legislation for personal information held by the public sector. However, neither the federal government nor the provinces, with the exception of Quebec, have privacy regulations for the private sector.

Dylan Wells (chair), Ron Arnett

Personal Information Protection Policy September, 2004 This policy applies to CUPE Local 1767 and has been adopted pursuant to the Personal Information Protection Act (BC). This policy was presented, opened for discussion, voted on, and accepted by the delegates at the 2004 CUPE 1767 AGM. CUPE 1767 as a union is responsible under the Protection […]

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