Journal Of Commerce – Horizon North to build homeless units in B.C.

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But, there is no guarantee that all the B.C. government-promised 2,000 modular units for the homeless will be B.C. built and create jobs.

“The modular buildings will be built in B.C., as well as Alberta,” Rajvir Rao, communications manager for B.C. Housing, said in an email. B.C. Housing is the entity handling the homeless contracts for the provincial government while the Vancouver Affording Housing Association is acting for the City of Vancouver.

Rao said it was a open call to all interested parties to build the units. As such, there is no requirement that the units be built in B.C. or use B.C. labour or materials such as wood. “While it is not a requirement of the RFQ, B.C. Housing supports the B.C. Wood First Initiative,” he said.

BC Housing is currently seeking an expression of interest from companies who can design and manufacture 1,400 housing units for distribution throughout B.C. The other 600 units have been allocated to Vancouver, with Horizon North supplying the units.

Rao said: “As a crown corporation, BC Housing is required, through a competitive public bid process, to identify the highest and best use of public money.”

In the 2017 budget update, the B.C. government announced it would spend $291 million to support the construction of 2,000 modular housing units over two years and spend $170 million over three years providing staffing and support services. It would spend another $208 million over four years to support the construction of more than 1,700 new units of affordable rental housing in B.C. communities.

The first of those contracts — with Vancouver getting $66 million in funding over what it normally provided for winter homeless shelters — will see those dollars staying in B.C. as Horizon North lands the first 78 units of up to 600 the city has subscribed to.

“It will all be (done) in B.C. with B.C. sourced wood and everyone in the plant will be a B.C. employee,” Graham said, as the manufacturing will be done at the company’s Kamloops plant.

Horizon North Camp and Catering Partnership beat out Ladacor Ltd./Atira Women’s Resource Society Partnership and Triple M Modular Ltd. (dba Britco Commercial) for the city contract.

Graham’s news is good news as both construction industry associations and building trades want to see public funds accruing benefits to local businesses and construction industry trades.

“We don’t need another Site C where 20 per cent of the work force is from Alberta,” said Tom Sigurdson, executive director of the BC Building Trades. “Every public project should include young people as apprentices, should have First Nations inclusion and work to get more women into the trades,” he said. “There is the opportunity for dividends to be paid back to B.C.”

Sigurdson has been vocal on the need for employers to find more positions for apprentices. “I can’t underscore enough the need for provision for apprentices and when we have a fabrication style of work like this, it is an ideal situation.” The manufacturing environment is not an open site and there is more opportunity for apprentices to interact with journeymen to learn from.

Chris Gardner, president of the Independent Contractors and Businesses Association, said “It is an excellent opportunity for B.C.’s modular home construction industry.”

He estimates that there are approximately 10 companies of varying size in B.C. able to opt into the B.C. Housing call for another 1,400 units of the announced 2,000. “I think most of them will,” he said, but the timeline may be a factor. Gardner believes there is the skill and capacity in B.C. to fulfill the order. Gardner is hopeful that “most (of the units) will likely be procured in B.C.”

The BC Housing October post on BidCentral for 1,400 modular homes has attracted 22 plan holders to the project with 17 from B.C. and five from Alberta, according to the B.C. Construction Association (BCCA). “This indicates there is capacity and interest amongst modular builders in B.C.,” said Lisa Stevens, BCCA marketing and communications consultant, in an email.

Graham said his company is bidding on the posted 1,400 units and has invested in making the Kamloops plant into a “centre of excellence” with software programs, working with Thompson Rivers University to use apprentices, and a workforce that is 14 per cent Indigenous. “We want a piece of it and we think we are quite good at what we do. We can deliver on a time line,” he said.

Graham’s company already has a major chunk of the business. The City of Vancouver has signed a memorandum of understanding with Horizon North to provide up to 600 units with each unit should be 250-350 square feet and 300 self-contained apartments should have a unit cost of $75,000 while the other 300 would have a unit cost of $145,000. The first group of housing is slated to go to a site at 57th and Cambie.

Graham said Horizon North has a track record with the City of Vancouver after building a modular housing unit at Terminal. The 40-unit modular building at Terminal and Main “was really a test case”, he said. Once the design was approved by the city’s Vancouver Affordable Housing Association, the order was processed quickly. “It took only 45 days,” he said for the units to be manufactured, trucked to site and erected by Northern Horizon’s crew.

Graham said the same kind of expediency is being applied to the city’s first order of 78 modular units in two buildings, which should be on site at 57th Ave. and Cambie by Christmas. “That is our intention,” he said, adding it will be up to the city to decide when they are open to occupancy. The Cambie and 57th Ave. site is one of a dozen under consideration by the city for allocation of further housing.

Horizon North is a modular home builder that has traditionally served the oil and gas sector but since Graham’s appoint three years ago as chief executive officer, it has deepened its path into other forms of modular construction, ranging from senior centres and hotels to multi-family. Recently, it acquired modular premium home builder Karoleena in Okanagan Falls. It also has a manufacturing plant in Grande Prairie.

ICBA’s Gardner said that the homeless initiative is only part of the problem in providing housing for all individuals in Vancouver. “The affordability in B.C. in housing is based upon supply,” he said and currently developers spend 2.5 to 3.5 years moving through permitting and regulation processes to get a project out of the ground.

“We just need different rules,” he said as the challenge is reducing red tape.

But, there is no guarantee that all the B.C. government-promised 2,000 modular units for the homeless will be B.C. built and create jobs. “The modular buildings will be built in B.C., as well as Alberta,” Rajvir Rao, communications manager for B.C. Housing, said in an email. B.C. Housing is the entity handling the homeless contracts […]

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Public consultations begin on BC proposed $15 minimum wage

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The first of eight public consultations held by the Fair Wages Commission began Thursday.

During the election campaign, the NDP promised to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2021.

“We launched the Fight for $15 campaign three years ago, and we are eager to see a $15/hour minimum wage implemented,” said Irene Lanzinger, president of the BC Federation of Labour.

In September, the government raised the minimum wage by 50 cents to $11.35.

Over the next three weeks of public meetings, the commission will be looking at the next steps deciding how and when the proposed $15 minimum wage should be implemented.

“We are encouraging people to take this opportunity to have their say on this critical issue. Low-wage earners are living below the poverty line at a time when we are facing an affordability crisis around the province,” said Lanzinger. “We must move swiftly to a $15/hour minimum wage and eliminate all exemptions, like the liquor server wage.

Advocates for workers say a higher minimum wage is needed now to make life more affordable for British Columbians but some in the business community argue that raising the wage too fast will hurt the economy and cost jobs.

The first of eight public consultations held by the Fair Wages Commission began Thursday. During the election campaign, the NDP promised to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2021. “We launched the Fight for $15 campaign three years ago, and we are eager to see a $15/hour minimum wage implemented,” said Irene […]

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Site C: Greens’ Weaver convinced NDP to OK dam — ‘irritating …

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VICTORIA — The future of the Site C hydroelectric dam is the subject of pointed questions from labour unions, environmental groups, Indigenous Peoples and high-ranking civil servants with the B.C. government who want answers about the projected costs of scrapping the $8.3-billion project.

The New Democrats are poised to decide Site C’s fate by the end of the year after a review by the B.C. Utilities Commission, the province’s independent energy regulator, concluded the dam is over budget and behind schedule.

But one Site C opponent said Friday he already senses the government will complete the megaproject.

Green Leader Andrew Weaver said he does not have inside information, but he is convinced the NDP will decide to keep building the dam, already under construction for more than two years.

“I can’t see them giving pink slips to thousands of people on Christmas Eve,” he said.

B.C. Hydro, the province’s public utility, says more than 2,000 people are working on Site C, which is near Fort St. John.

Weaver said he began to feel the government moving towards supporting the project this week after a group of labour unions said the utilities commission report did not properly calculate the cost of stopping Site C. An estimated $4 billion has been spent on Site C so far.

The project also faced tough questions from senior officials in the Finance and Energy ministries who wrote to the utilities commission wanting more answers about the costs of killing Site C. The two deputy ministers also asked for clarification about the impact on future hydro rates if the project was stopped.

The Site C Dam location is seen along the Peace River in Fort St. John, B.C., in April 2017.


The Site C Dam location is seen along the Peace River in Fort St. John, B.C., in April 2017.

JONATHAN HAYWARD /

CANADIAN PRESS Files

“If the Site C project were terminated, the $4 billion sunk and remediation costs would need to be recovered, and the amortization period of that recovery would affect B.C. Hydro rates,” the letter states. “Could the commission clarify whether it assumed that these costs would be recovered over 10, 30 or 70 years?”

Energy experts representing residents in the Peace River area, where the dam is under construction, said the utilities commission report answered the questions about the $4 billion.

“The BCUC treatment of these costs is consistent with economic theory and practice and concludes that there is no cost advantage to proceeding with Site C,” U.S. energy expert Robert McCullough says in a letter on behalf of the Peace Valley Landowner Association.

Energy Minister Michelle Mungall said in a statement she travelled to the northeast this week with Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser to meet with local Indigenous communities and others, including business leaders, about Site C.

She gave no indication the government has already made up its mind on the project’s future.

“We attended meetings to listen, and to discuss issues as they relate to Site C,” said Mungall. “We will bring First Nations perspectives back to the provincial cabinet over the next few weeks.”

Weaver said the Greens, who have an agreement to back the minority government in the legislature, will remind the NDP at every opportunity about its change of position if it keeps the project going.

“We’ll add that to the collection of things we find really irritating that you’ve done,” he said.

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VICTORIA — The future of the Site C hydroelectric dam is the subject of pointed questions from labour unions, environmental groups, Indigenous Peoples and high-ranking civil servants with the B.C. government who want answers about the projected costs of scrapping the $8.3-billion project. The New Democrats are poised to decide Site C’s fate by the […]

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Brian Cochrane and Adam Van Steinburg: Community benefit agreements increase public return on construction …

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The B.C. government is considering the future of the Site C dam project — whether to complete it (our preference) or shut it down. Whichever side you take in the debate, it has giving B.C. a chance to think about how to get maximum value from public construction.

In our view, it’s time for B.C. to return to the collaborative model of construction management that prevailed before 2001. The provincial government spends billions of dollars every year on electric power projects, highways and other infrastructure. We need formal mechanisms to ensure that this investment flows back into B.C. regions to support families, local businesses and workforce development.

These are not abstract ideas. B.C. has a proven track record of creating project agreements that put real dollars into the pockets of real people.

Long-time premier W.A.C. Bennett, a hero of the conservative cause, made use of project agreements with labour and contractors when his government built the big hydro dams in the 1960s. He did it to achieve cost certainty and a guaranteed supply of construction workers. He knew that by working with unions in good faith, he would complete provincial projects safely and on time.

The NDP government updated the project labour agreement model on the Vancouver Island Highway Project in the 1990s. It provided fair wages and working conditions for all workers on the job, whether their employer was union or non-union. It delivered business and employment benefits for the Island’s First Nations and measures to hire and train women in construction. The project was completed at the end of the NDP term within the 1993 budget.

The Liberal government under Gordon Campbell scrapped the Vancouver Island agreement and closed the door on any new agreements. The Liberals preferred a strictly low-bid approach, where contractors would have no obligation to use certified tradespeople, train apprentices, hire locally or bring First Nations and women into the construction workforce.

By ignoring the interests of working people and communities, the Liberals were going to save the taxpayer big bucks. But guess what?

On B.C. Hydro’s Site C, a recent independent report from consultants at Deloitte found that the project has already overshot its budget. “Low bid” is turning into a nightmare. Deloitte put “performance issues of contractors” first on the list of project risks.

B.C.’s construction unions, such as the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 115 and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 213, advocate for what we now call community benefit agreements. Yes, these structured project agreements will be great for our members. But we know from experience that contractors will benefit too, from the on-site safety services unions provide, the experienced labour that unions provide, and the resulting productivity.

Government and its agencies will benefit from cost certainty and quality assurance. And we’re urging the B.C. government to talk to communities and First Nations about local hiring, essential skills training and apprentice training. Unions are qualified to help provide that training because — in the view of Jessica McDonald, the deputy minister to former premier Christy Clark who wrote a report on training in 2014 — unions are the most effective skills trainers in the province, with the highest rate of apprentice program completion.

Under our proposal to the government, community benefits agreements will deliver:

• industry-standard wages, benefits and contributions for all workers, union and non-union;

• industry-standard safety rules and requirements;

• programs to advance women, First Nations and apprentices;

• a ban on the employment of workers from offshore under sub-standard employment and living conditions;

• a guarantee of wage predictability and no labour disruptions, to support project completion on time and on budget;

• a fair bidding process open to all contractors, union and non-union, with selection based on demonstrated excellence in project management.

Some critics suggest that our proposal is scary. In fact, it pulls together priorities that governments of all stripes have been working toward for the past decade. At its most controversial, the community benefit agreement model requires that public construction projects should serve the public first, rather than the interests of non-union contractors.

Brian Cochrane is business manager for the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 115; Adam Van Steinburg is business manager for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 213 and vice-president of the B.C. and Yukon Building Trades Council.


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The B.C. government is considering the future of the Site C dam project — whether to complete it (our preference) or shut it down. Whichever side you take in the debate, it has giving B.C. a chance to think about how to get maximum value from public construction. In our view, it’s time for B.C. […]

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Communications

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Communications Committee – The communications committee is looking for interested members to help plan and execute a communications strategy for our local. This strategy will look at how internal and external communications are delivered. We will also look at how to leverage social media and traditional media in our operations. Time committment for this committee will be minimal but there will likely be ongoing teleconferences/emails in the development of the strategy.

Members: Mandeep Mahanger (Chair), Ron Arnett and Dylan Wells

Communications Committee – The communications committee is looking for interested members to help plan and execute a communications strategy for our local. This strategy will look at how internal and external communications are delivered. We will also look at how to leverage social media and traditional media in our operations. Time committment for this committee […]

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Green leader senses NDP support for Site C, minister says no decisions made yet

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The future of the Site C hydroelectric dam is the subject of pointed questions from labour unions, environmental groups, Indigenous Peoples and high-ranking civil servants with the British Columbia government who want answers about the projected costs of scrapping the $8.3-billion project.

The New Democrats are poised to decide Site C’s fate by the end of the year after a review by the B.C. Utilities Commission, the province’s independent energy regulator, concluded the dam is over budget and behind schedule.

But one Site C opponent said Friday he already senses the government will complete the megaproject.

Green Leader Andrew Weaver said he does not have inside information, but he is convinced the NDP will decide to keep building the dam, already under construction for more than two years.

“I can’t see them giving pink slips to thousands of people on Christmas Eve,” he said.

B.C. Hydro, the province’s public utility, says more than 2,000 people are working on Site C, which is near Fort St. John.

Weaver said he began to feel the government moving towards supporting the project this week after a group of labour unions said the utilities commission report did not properly calculate the cost of stopping Site C. An estimated $4 billion has been spent on Site C so far.

The project also faced tough questions from senior officials in the Finance and Energy ministries who wrote to the utilities commission wanting more answers about the costs of killing Site C. The two deputy ministers also asked for clarification about the impact on future hydro rates if the project was stopped.

“If the Site C project were terminated, the $4 billion sunk and remediation costs would need to be recovered, and the amortization period of that recovery would affect B.C. Hydro rates,” the letter states. “Could the commission clarify whether it assumed that these costs would be recovered over 10, 30 or 70 years?”

Energy experts representing residents in the Peace River area, where the dam is under construction, said the utilities commission report answered the questions about the $4 billion.

“The BCUC treatment of these costs is consistent with economic theory and practice and concludes that there is no cost advantage to proceeding with Site C,” U.S. energy expert Robert McCullough says in a letter on behalf of the Peace Valley Landowner Association.

Energy Minister Michelle Mungall said in a statement she travelled to the northeast this week with Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser to meet with local Indigenous communities and others, including business leaders, about Site C.

She gave no indication the government has already made up its mind on the project’s future.

“We attended meetings to listen, and to discuss issues as they relate to Site C,” said Mungall. “We will bring First Nations perspectives back to the provincial cabinet over the next few weeks.”

Weaver said the Greens, who have an agreement to back the minority government in the legislature, will remind the NDP at every opportunity about its change of position if it keeps the project going.

“We’ll add that to the collection of things we find really irritating that you’ve done,” he said.

The future of the Site C hydroelectric dam is the subject of pointed questions from labour unions, environmental groups, Indigenous Peoples and high-ranking civil servants with the British Columbia government who want answers about the projected costs of scrapping the $8.3-billion project. The New Democrats are poised to decide Site C’s fate by the end […]

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Greens’ Weaver convinced NDP will support Site C, an ‘irritating’ decision

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VICTORIA — The future of the Site C hydroelectric dam is the subject of pointed questions from labour unions, environmental groups, Indigenous Peoples and high-ranking civil servants with the B.C. government who want answers about the projected costs of scrapping the $8.3-billion project.

The New Democrats are poised to decide Site C’s fate by the end of the year after a review by the B.C. Utilities Commission, the province’s independent energy regulator, concluded the dam is over budget and behind schedule.

But one Site C opponent said Friday he already senses the government will complete the megaproject.

Green Leader Andrew Weaver said he does not have inside information, but he is convinced the NDP will decide to keep building the dam, already under construction for more than two years.

“I can’t see them giving pink slips to thousands of people on Christmas Eve,” he said.

B.C. Hydro, the province’s public utility, says more than 2,000 people are working on Site C, which is near Fort St. John.

Weaver said he began to feel the government moving towards supporting the project this week after a group of labour unions said the utilities commission report did not properly calculate the cost of stopping Site C. An estimated $4 billion has been spent on Site C so far.

The project also faced tough questions from senior officials in the Finance and Energy ministries who wrote to the utilities commission wanting more answers about the costs of killing Site C. The two deputy ministers also asked for clarification about the impact on future hydro rates if the project was stopped.

The Site C Dam location is seen along the Peace River in Fort St. John, B.C., in April 2017.


The Site C Dam location is seen along the Peace River in Fort St. John, B.C., in April 2017.

JONATHAN HAYWARD /

CANADIAN PRESS Files

“If the Site C project were terminated, the $4 billion sunk and remediation costs would need to be recovered, and the amortization period of that recovery would affect B.C. Hydro rates,” the letter states. “Could the commission clarify whether it assumed that these costs would be recovered over 10, 30 or 70 years?”

Energy experts representing residents in the Peace River area, where the dam is under construction, said the utilities commission report answered the questions about the $4 billion.

“The BCUC treatment of these costs is consistent with economic theory and practice and concludes that there is no cost advantage to proceeding with Site C,” U.S. energy expert Robert McCullough says in a letter on behalf of the Peace Valley Landowner Association.

Energy Minister Michelle Mungall said in a statement she travelled to the northeast this week with Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser to meet with local Indigenous communities and others, including business leaders, about Site C.

She gave no indication the government has already made up its mind on the project’s future.

“We attended meetings to listen, and to discuss issues as they relate to Site C,” said Mungall. “We will bring First Nations perspectives back to the provincial cabinet over the next few weeks.”

Weaver said the Greens, who have an agreement to back the minority government in the legislature, will remind the NDP at every opportunity about its change of position if it keeps the project going.

“We’ll add that to the collection of things we find really irritating that you’ve done,” he said.

Related

CLICK HERE to report a typo.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email vantips@postmedia.com.

VICTORIA — The future of the Site C hydroelectric dam is the subject of pointed questions from labour unions, environmental groups, Indigenous Peoples and high-ranking civil servants with the B.C. government who want answers about the projected costs of scrapping the $8.3-billion project. The New Democrats are poised to decide Site C’s fate by the […]

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Occupational Health & Safety

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Introduction

Your Occupational Health and Safety Committee is in place to help protect the Members of CUPE 1767.  The Health and Safety of our Members is a top priority.  Every Member in our Local has the right to a safe workplace.  We must protect this right.

A safe workplace means different things to different people and people have different perceptions as to what a safe workplace is.  To some it may mean breathing clean air, having a comfortable and ergonomically correct workstation, having the snow removed from the office parking lot, having enough field workers to do the job, not having to put up with any verbal abuse from an untrusting, unprofessional/incompetent manager, and the list can go on and on.  Each of the above items are all serious concerns, plus the lists could expand to hundreds more, and each are Health and Safety concerns that must be dealt with and will not be tolerated by this Committee or this Local.

Over the years, CUPE has helped strengthen the Health & Safety laws in BC.  We have all heard about the degradation of government services over the past several years, however, most of us have not experienced these unnecessary service cuts.  Not until you experience some of these barbaric cuts, or have a family member needing services that are no longer available or are only available at horrendous cost, will you really know what has happened to your services over the past several years.  It is a sad state of affairs.  We must speak out and against any government, including the BC Liberals, regarding any threats of changes to WCB Regulations and Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and any other cuts to our workforces or services.  We must all protect the gains we have made in creating a healthier and safer workplace for now and for the future.

The OH&S Committee is also part of the Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee.  There are two CUPE 1767 Representatives on this Committee along with two non-union representatives from the employer.  The union representatives for 2016-2017 are Christina Infanti and Mandeep Mahanger.  Members of the JOH&S Committee are always available to discuss any health and/or safety concern from any employee of BC Assessment Authority.  This Committee is required by law and meets several times throughout the year.  Besides face-to-face meetings, this Committee communicates by various electronic means in order to deal with issues expediently and cost-effectively.

As stated in Section 9 of our Collective Agreement, “The Authority and its employees acknowledges the mutual benefit to be derived from joint consultation and its value in maintaining and improving service to the public and agree therefore to consult and act on matters of the common interest, as appropriate, when requested by either party.”

Local Office Safety Committees

Along with the OH&S Committee and the JOH&S Committee, there are Local Office Safety Committees in each office.  These front line committees consist of one Union Representative (usually the Area Rep) and one manager from the non-union ranks.  This Committee is required to meet monthly as dictated by law in Division 4 of the WCB Regulations.  WCB has allowed our employer a variation in the number of members required on the Local Office Safety Committee.  WCB Regulations states that, for offices over 20 people, a 4 person Committee is required.  Due to the active involvement of the JOH&S Committee, a variation has been given requiring only 2 people on the Local Office Safety Committee providing that all offices participate.  Offices that do not participate in holding monthly meetings and posting the Local Office Safety Meetings Minutes may require WCB to re-examine and remove their variation given to BC Assessment.  The minutes from these meetings are reviewed by the JOH&S Committee.

The JOH&S Committee is proud of their accomplishments over the years that have lead the employer in establishing a Non-Smoking Workplace (one of the first in the Province), Flu Shot Program (funded by the employer), Evacuation Procedures, Ergonomic training (Handheld and Workstation), Violence Prevention training, Violent Prevention Policy, First Aid Policy, employer purchase of health and safety videos, and on-going risk assessment (just to name a few).

 

Reporting Forms

Items of concerns from the Membership are usually fed back to this Committee by completing the appropriate form.  There is a form for reporting any health and safety concern called theLocal Safety Return and another for reporting any and all violent incidents called the Violent Incident Report.  These forms are located in the Forms section of this website or the BC Assessment Employee Portal and are also available from your Area Rep.

The Local Safety Return is the means of communicating a concern to the JOH&S Committee.  Steps to completing this form:

The Area Rep, Alt Rep or the member with the concern fills out the form to the headingAction Taken by Manager.  Be as detailed and factual as possible.  Date and sign the form.  Attach a written sheet if more details are required.  Make a copy for your records.

After you have completed the top part of the form it is given to your manager for them to complete.  Time may be given to the manager to check into corrective action.  One or two days at the most should be sufficient for most concerns.  Note: you can contact a member of the JOH&S Committee at any time to discuss or inform us of the concern.

When you get the form back from the manager or if a couple of days have passed and no appropriate action is being taken, contact either Lauralee Epps or Tina Dhami.

The Local Safety Return becomes a valuable tool to the JOH&S Committee as to the memberships concerns.  Even if the issue is resolved at the local level, it informs the Committee as to a concern and may help in eliminating other similar concerns.

The Violent Incident Report Form is completed after any incident in which a member’s safety has been threatened by someone other than a fellow employee.  Follow the following steps:

Part A is to be completed by the employee.  Make a copy and give it to your Local Safety Officer (usually the Area or Alt Rep).

 of the incident give Part A along with Part B to your Manager to complete and to take action.

The form then goes to the Local Safety Officer (Area or Alt Rep) for the completion of Part C.  If the action taken by the manager is acceptable to the employee who initiated the concern then this would be stated in this section.

Parts B & C must be completed and sent to the Area Assessor or HO Director, JOH&S Committee and the employee who is reporting the incident within 72 hours

Chair: Christina Infanti, Member: Mandeep Mahanger Member at large: Stephanie Vielle

Introduction Your Occupational Health and Safety Committee is in place to help protect the Members of CUPE 1767.  The Health and Safety of our Members is a top priority.  Every Member in our Local has the right to a safe workplace.  We must protect this right. A safe workplace means different things to different people and […]

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Finance

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This committee deals with budget items and funds of the local.  It also deals with the locals human resources items and is reported out within the Secretary/Treasurers report at each of the executive meetings and the AGM.

David Robertson (chair), Jared Melvin and Harp Sandhu

This committee deals with budget items and funds of the local.  It also deals with the locals human resources items and is reported out within the Secretary/Treasurers report at each of the executive meetings and the AGM. David Robertson (chair), Jared Melvin and Harp Sandhu

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Policy

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Harp Sandhu (Chair), Christina Infanti, Jared Melvin

Harp Sandhu (Chair), Christina Infanti, Jared Melvin

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